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NEW QUESTION 1
The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) specifies fines that may be levied against data controllers for certain infringements. Which of the following will be subject to administrative fines of up to 10 000 000 EUR, or in the case of an undertaking, up to 2% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year?

  • A. Failure to demonstrate that consent was given by the data subject to the processing of their personal data where it is used as the basis for processing
  • B. Failure to implement technical and organizational measures to ensure data protection is enshrined by design and default
  • C. Failure to process personal information in a manner compatible with its original purpose
  • D. Failure to provide the means for a data subject to rectify inaccuracies in personal data

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 2
You would like your organization to be independently audited to demonstrate compliance with international privacy standards and to identify gaps for remediation.
Which type of audit would help you achieve this objective?

  • A. First-party audit.
  • B. Second-party audit.
  • C. Third-party audit.
  • D. Fourth-party audit.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 3
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Amira is thrilled about the sudden expansion of NatGen. As the joint Chief Executive Officer (CEO) with her long-time business partner Sadie, Amira has watched the company grow into a major competitor in the green energy market. The current line of products includes wind turbines, solar energy panels, and equipment for geothermal systems. A talented team of developers means that NatGen's line of products will only continue to grow.
With the expansion, Amira and Sadie have received advice from new senior staff members brought on to help manage the company's growth. One recent suggestion has been to combine the legal and security functions of the company to ensure observance of privacy laws and the company's own privacy policy. This sounds overly complicated to Amira, who wants departments to be able to use, collect, store, and dispose of customer data in ways that will best suit their needs. She does not want administrative oversight and complex structuring to get in the way of people doing innovative work.
Sadie has a similar outlook. The new Chief Information Officer (CIO) has proposed what Sadie believes is an unnecessarily long timetable for designing a new privacy program. She has assured him that NatGen will use the best possible equipment for electronic storage of customer and employee data. She simply needs a list of equipment and an estimate of its cost. But the CIO insists that many issues are necessary to consider before the company gets to that stage.
Regardless, Sadie and Amira insist on giving employees space to do their jobs. Both CEOs want to entrust the monitoring of employee policy compliance to low-level managers. Amira and Sadie believe these managers can adjust the company privacy policy according to what works best for their particular departments. NatGen's CEOs know that flexible interpretations of the privacy policy in the name of promoting green energy would be highly unlikely to raise any concerns with their customer base, as long as the data is always used in course of normal business activities.
Perhaps what has been most perplexing to Sadie and Amira has been the CIO's recommendation to institute a privacy compliance hotline. Sadie and Amira have relented on this point, but they hope to compromise by allowing employees to take turns handling reports of privacy policy violations. The implementation will be easy because the employees need no special preparation. They will simply have to document any concerns they hear.
Sadie and Amira are aware that it will be challenging to stay true to their principles and guard against corporate culture strangling creativity and employee morale. They hope that all senior staff will see the benefit of trying a unique approach.
Based on the scenario, what additional change will increase the effectiveness of the privacy compliance hotline?

  • A. Outsourcing the hotline.
  • B. A system for staff education.
  • C. Strict communication channels.
  • D. An ethics complaint department.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 4
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Henry Home Furnishings has built high-end furniture for nearly forty years. However, the new owner, Anton, has found some degree of disorganization after touring the company headquarters. His uncle Henry had always focused on production – not data processing – and Anton is concerned. In several storage rooms, he has found paper files, disks, and old computers that appear to contain the personal data of current and former employees and customers. Anton knows that a single break-in could irrevocably damage the company's relationship with its loyal customers. He intends to set a goal of guaranteed zero loss of personal information.
To this end, Anton originally planned to place restrictions on who was admitted to the physical premises of the company. However, Kenneth – his uncle's vice president and longtime confidante – wants to hold off on Anton's idea in favor of converting any paper records held at the company to electronic storage. Kenneth believes this process would only take one or two years. Anton likes this idea; he envisions a password- protected system that only he and Kenneth can access.
Anton also plans to divest the company of most of its subsidiaries. Not only will this make his job easier, but it will simplify the management of the stored data. The heads of subsidiaries like the art gallery and kitchenware store down the street will be responsible for their own information management. Then, any unneeded subsidiary data still in Anton's possession can be destroyed within the next few years.
After learning of a recent security incident, Anton realizes that another crucial step will be notifying customers. Kenneth insists that two lost hard drives in Question are not cause for concern; all of the data was encrypted and not sensitive in nature. Anton does not want to take any chances, however. He intends on sending notice letters to all employees and customers to be safe.
Anton must also check for compliance with all legislative, regulatory, and market requirements related to privacy protection. Kenneth oversaw the development of the company's online presence about ten years ago, but Anton is not confident about his understanding of recent online marketing laws. Anton is assigning another trusted employee with a law background the task of the compliance assessment. After a thorough analysis, Anton knows the company should be safe for another five years, at which time he can order another check.
Documentation of this analysis will show auditors due diligence.
Anton has started down a long road toward improved management of the company, but he knows the effort is worth it. Anton wants his uncle's legacy to continue for many years to come.
Which of Anton's plans for improving the data management of the company is most unachievable?

  • A. His initiative to achieve regulatory compliance.
  • B. His intention to transition to electronic storage.
  • C. His objective for zero loss of personal information.
  • D. His intention to send notice letters to customers and employees.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 5
Which is the best way to view an organization’s privacy framework?

  • A. As an industry benchmark that can apply to many organizations
  • B. As a fixed structure that directs changes in the organization
  • C. As an aspirational goal that improves the organization
  • D. As a living structure that aligns to changes in the organization

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 6
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
As the Director of data protection for Consolidated Records Corporation, you are justifiably pleased with your accomplishments so far. Your hiring was precipitated by warnings from regulatory agencies following a series of relatively minor data breaches that could easily have been worse. However, you have not had a reportable incident for the three years that you have been with the company. In fact, you consider your program a model that others in the data storage industry may note in their own program development.
You started the program at Consolidated from a jumbled mix of policies and procedures and worked toward coherence across departments and throughout operations. You were aided along the way by the program's sponsor, the vice president of operations, as well as by a Privacy Team that started from a clear understanding of the need for change.
Initially, your work was greeted with little confidence or enthusiasm by the company's "old guard" among both the executive team and frontline personnel working with data and interfacing with clients. Through the use of metrics that showed the costs not only of the breaches that had occurred, but also projections of the costs that easily could occur given the current state of operations, you soon had the leaders and key decision-makers largely on your side. Many of the other employees were more resistant, but face-to-face meetings with each department and the development of a baseline privacy training program achieved sufficient "buy-in" to begin putting the proper procedures into place.
Now, privacy protection is an accepted component of all current operations involving personal or protected data and must be part of the end product of any process of technological development. While your approach is not systematic, it is fairly effective.
You are left contemplating:
What must be done to maintain the program and develop it beyond just a data breach prevention program? How can you build on your success?
What are the next action steps?
What process could most effectively be used to add privacy protections to a new, comprehensive program being developed at Consolidated?

  • A. Privacy by Design.
  • B. Privacy Step Assessment.
  • C. Information Security Planning.
  • D. Innovation Privacy Standards.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 7
What should a privacy professional keep in mind when selecting which metrics to collect?

  • A. Metrics should be reported to the public.
  • B. The number of metrics should be limited at first.
  • C. Metrics should reveal strategies for increasing company earnings.
  • D. A variety of metrics should be collected before determining their specific functions.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 8
What is the best way to understand the location, use and importance of personal data within an organization?

  • A. By analyzing the data inventory.
  • B. By testing the security of data systems.
  • C. By evaluating methods for collecting data.
  • D. By interviewing employees tasked with data entry.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 9
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Manasa is a product manager at Omnipresent Omnimedia, where she is responsible for leading the development of the company's flagship product, the Handy Helper. The Handy Helper is an application that can be used in the home to manage family calendars, do online shopping, and schedule doctor appointments. After having had a successful launch in the United States, the Handy Helper is about to be made available for purchase worldwide.
The packaging and user guide for the Handy Helper indicate that it is a "privacy friendly" product suitable for the whole family, including children, but does not provide any further detail or privacy notice. In order to use the application, a family creates a single account, and the primary user has access to all information about the other users. Upon start up, the primary user must check a box consenting to receive marketing emails from Omnipresent Omnimedia and selected marketing partners in order to be able to use the application.
Sanjay, the head of privacy at Omnipresent Omnimedia, was working on an agreement with a European distributor of Handy Helper when he fielded many Questions about the product from the distributor. Sanjay needed to look more closely at the product in order to be able to answer the Questions as he was not involved in the product development process.
In speaking with the product team, he learned that the Handy Helper collected and stored all of a user's sensitive medical information for the medical appointment scheduler. In fact, all of the user's information is stored by Handy Helper for the additional purpose of creating additional products and to analyze usage of the product. This data is all stored in the cloud and is encrypted both during transmission and at rest.
Consistent with the CEO's philosophy that great new product ideas can come from anyone, all Omnipresent Omnimedia employees have access to user data under a program called Eureka. Omnipresent Omnimedia is hoping that at some point in the future, the data will reveal insights that could be used to create a fully automated application that runs on artificial intelligence, but as of yet, Eureka is not well-defined and is considered a long-term goal.
What administrative safeguards should be implemented to protect the collected data while in use by Manasa and her product management team?

  • A. Document the data flows for the collected data.
  • B. Conduct a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) to evaluate the risks involved.
  • C. Implement a policy restricting data access on a "need to know" basis.
  • D. Limit data transfers to the US by keeping data collected in Europe within a local data center.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 10
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Paul Daniels, with years of experience as a CEO, is worried about his son Carlton's successful venture, Gadgo. A technological innovator in the communication industry that quickly became profitable, Gadgo has moved beyond its startup phase. While it has retained its vibrant energy, Paul fears that under Carlton's
direction, the company may not be taking its risks or obligations as seriously as it needs to. Paul has hired you, a Privacy Consultant, to assess the company and report to both father and son. "Carlton won't listen to me," Paul says, "but he may pay attention to an expert."
Gadgo's workplace is a clubhouse for innovation, with games, toys, snacks. espresso machines, giant fish tanks and even an iguana who regards you with little interest. Carlton, too, seems bored as he describes to you the company's procedures and technologies for data protection. It's a loose assemblage of controls, lacking consistency and with plenty of weaknesses. "This is a technology company," Carlton says. "We create. We innovate. I don't want unnecessary measures that will only slow people down and clutter their thoughts."
The meeting lasts until early evening. Upon leaving, you walk through the office it looks as if a strong windstorm has recently blown through, with papers scattered across desks and tables and even the floor. A "cleaning crew" of one teenager is emptying the trash bins. A few computers have been left on for the night, others are missing. Carlton takes note of your attention to this: "Most of my people take their laptops home with them, or use their own tablets or phones. I want them to use whatever helps them to think and be ready day or night for that great insight. It may only come once!"
What phase in the Privacy Maturity Model (PMM) does Gadgo's privacy program best exhibit?

  • A. Ad hoc.
  • B. Defined.
  • C. Repeatable.
  • D. Managed.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 11
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Amira is thrilled about the sudden expansion of NatGen. As the joint Chief Executive Officer (CEO) with her long-time business partner Sadie, Amira has watched the company grow into a major competitor in the green energy market. The current line of products includes wind turbines, solar energy panels, and equipment for geothermal systems. A talented team of developers means that NatGen's line of products will only continue to grow.
With the expansion, Amira and Sadie have received advice from new senior staff members brought on to help manage the company's growth. One recent suggestion has been to combine the legal and security functions of the company to ensure observance of privacy laws and the company's own privacy policy. This sounds overly complicated to Amira, who wants departments to be able to use, collect, store, and dispose of customer data in ways that will best suit their needs. She does not want administrative oversight and complex structuring to get in the way of people doing innovative work.
Sadie has a similar outlook. The new Chief Information Officer (CIO) has proposed what Sadie believes is an unnecessarily long timetable for designing a new privacy program. She has assured him that NatGen will use the best possible equipment for electronic storage of customer and employee data. She simply needs a list of equipment and an estimate of its cost. But the CIO insists that many issues are necessary to consider before the company gets to that stage.
Regardless, Sadie and Amira insist on giving employees space to do their jobs. Both CEOs want to entrust the monitoring of employee policy compliance to low-level managers. Amira and Sadie believe these managers can adjust the company privacy policy according to what works best for their particular departments. NatGen's CEOs know that flexible interpretations of the privacy policy in the name of promoting green energy would be highly unlikely to raise any concerns with their customer base, as long as the data is always used in course of normal business activities.
Perhaps what has been most perplexing to Sadie and Amira has been the CIO's recommendation to institute a privacy compliance hotline. Sadie and Amira have relented on this point, but they hope to compromise by allowing employees to take turns handling reports of privacy policy violations. The implementation will be easy because the employees need no special preparation. They will simply have to document any concerns they hear.
Sadie and Amira are aware that it will be challenging to stay true to their principles and guard against corporate culture strangling creativity and employee morale. They hope that all senior staff will see the benefit of trying a unique approach.
What Data Lifecycle Management (DLM) principle should the company follow if they end up allowing departments to interpret the privacy policy differently?

  • A. Prove the authenticity of the company's records.
  • B. Arrange for official credentials for staff members.
  • C. Adequately document reasons for inconsistencies.
  • D. Create categories to reflect degrees of data importance.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 12
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Penny has recently joined Ace Space, a company that sells homeware accessories online, as its new privacy officer. The company is based in California but thanks to some great publicity from a social media influencer last year, the company has received an influx of sales from the EU and has set up a regional office in Ireland to support this expansion. To become familiar with Ace Space’s practices and assess what her privacy priorities will be, Penny has set up meetings with a number of colleagues to hear about the work that they have been doing and their compliance efforts.
Penny’s colleague in Marketing is excited by the new sales and the company’s plans, but is also concerned that Penny may curtail some of the growth opportunities he has planned. He tells her “I heard someone in the breakroom talking about some new privacy laws but I really don’t think it affects us. We’re just a small company. I mean we just sell accessories online, so what’s the real risk?” He has also told her that he works with a number of small companies that help him get projects completed in a hurry. “We’ve got to meet our deadlines otherwise we lose money. I just sign the contracts and get Jim in finance to push through the payment. Reviewing the contracts takes time that we just don’t have.”
In her meeting with a member of the IT team, Penny has learned that although Ace Space has taken a number of precautions to protect its website from malicious activity, it has not taken the same level of care of its physical files or internal infrastructure. Penny’s colleague in IT has told her that a former employee lost an encrypted USB key with financial data on it when he left. The company nearly lost access to their customer database last year after they fell victim to a phishing attack. Penny is told by her IT colleague that the IT team “didn’t know what to do or who should do what. We hadn’t been trained on it but we’re a small team though, so it worked out OK in the end.” Penny is concerned that these issues will compromise Ace Space’s privacy and data protection.
Penny is aware that the company has solid plans to grow its international sales and will be working closely with the CEO to give the organization a data “shake up”. Her mission is to cultivate a strong privacy culture within the company.
Penny has a meeting with Ace Space’s CEO today and has been asked to give her first impressions and an overview of her next steps.
To help Penny and her CEO with their objectives, what would be the most helpful approach to address her IT concerns?

  • A. Roll out an encryption policy
  • B. Undertake a tabletop exercise
  • C. Ensure inventory of IT assets is maintained
  • D. Host a town hall discussion for all IT employees

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 13
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Henry Home Furnishings has built high-end furniture for nearly forty years. However, the new owner, Anton, has found some degree of disorganization after touring the company headquarters. His uncle Henry had always focused on production – not data processing – and Anton is concerned. In several storage rooms, he has found paper files, disks, and old computers that appear to contain the personal data of current and former employees and customers. Anton knows that a single break-in could irrevocably damage the company's relationship with its loyal customers. He intends to set a goal of guaranteed zero loss of personal information.
To this end, Anton originally planned to place restrictions on who was admitted to the physical premises of the company. However, Kenneth – his uncle's vice president and longtime confidante – wants to hold off on Anton's idea in favor of converting any paper records held at the company to electronic storage. Kenneth believes this process would only take one or two years. Anton likes this idea; he envisions a password- protected system that only he and Kenneth can access.
Anton also plans to divest the company of most of its subsidiaries. Not only will this make his job easier, but it will simplify the management of the stored data. The heads of subsidiaries like the art gallery and kitchenware store down the street will be responsible for their own information management. Then, any unneeded subsidiary data still in Anton's possession can be destroyed within the next few years.
After learning of a recent security incident, Anton realizes that another crucial step will be notifying customers. Kenneth insists that two lost hard drives in Question are not cause for concern; all of the data was encrypted and not sensitive in nature. Anton does not want to take any chances, however. He intends on sending notice letters to all employees and customers to be safe.
Anton must also check for compliance with all legislative, regulatory, and market requirements related to privacy protection. Kenneth oversaw the development of the company's online presence about ten years ago, but Anton is not confident about his understanding of recent online marketing laws. Anton is assigning another trusted employee with a law background the task of the compliance assessment. After a thorough analysis, Anton knows the company should be safe for another five years, at which time he can order another check.
Documentation of this analysis will show auditors due diligence.
Anton has started down a long road toward improved management of the company, but he knows the effort is worth it. Anton wants his uncle's legacy to continue for many years to come.
What would the company's legal team most likely recommend to Anton regarding his planned communication with customers?

  • A. To send consistent communication.
  • B. To shift to electronic communication.
  • C. To delay communications until local authorities are informed.
  • D. To consider under what circumstances communication is necessary.

Answer: D

NEW QUESTION 14
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Perhaps Jack Kelly should have stayed in the U.S. He enjoys a formidable reputation inside the company, Special Handling Shipping, for his work in reforming certain "rogue" offices. Last year, news broke that a police sting operation had revealed a drug ring operating in the Providence, Rhode Island office in the United States. Video from the office's video surveillance cameras leaked to news operations showed a drug exchange between Special Handling staff and undercover officers.
In the wake of this incident, Kelly had been sent to Providence to change the "hands off" culture that upper management believed had let the criminal elements conduct their illicit transactions. After a few weeks under Kelly's direction, the office became a model of efficiency and customer service. Kelly monitored his workers' activities using the same cameras that had recorded the illegal conduct of their former co-workers.
Now Kelly has been charged with turning around the office in Cork, Ireland, another trouble spot. The company has received numerous reports of the staff leaving the office unattended. When Kelly arrived, he found that even when present, the staff often spent their days socializing or conducting personal business on their mobile phones. Again, he observed their behaviors using surveillance cameras. He issued written reprimands to six staff members based on the first day of video alone.
Much to Kelly's surprise and chagrin, he and the company are now under investigation by the Data Protection Commissioner of Ireland for allegedly violating the privacy rights of employees. Kelly was told that the company's license for the cameras listed facility security as their main use, but he does not know why this matters. He has pointed out to his superiors that the company's training programs on privacy protection and data collection mention nothing about surveillance video.
You are a privacy protection consultant, hired by the company to assess this incident, report on the legal and compliance issues, and recommend next steps.
What should you advise this company regarding the status of security cameras at their offices in the United States?

  • A. Add security cameras at facilities that are now without them.
  • B. Set policies about the purpose and use of the security cameras.
  • C. Reduce the number of security cameras located inside the building.
  • D. Restrict access to surveillance video taken by the security cameras and destroy the recordings after a designated period of time.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 15
What is the name for the privacy strategy model that describes delegated decision making?

  • A. De-centralized.
  • B. De-functionalized.
  • C. Hybrid.
  • D. Matrix.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 16
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
For 15 years, Albert has worked at Treasure Box – a mail order company in the United States (U.S.) that used to sell decorative candles around the world, but has recently decided to limit its shipments to customers in the 48 contiguous states. Despite his years of experience, Albert is often overlooked for managerial positions. His frustration about not being promoted, coupled with his recent interest in issues of privacy protection, have motivated Albert to be an agent of positive change.
He will soon interview for a newly advertised position, and during the interview, Albert plans on making executives aware of lapses in the company’s privacy program. He feels certain he will be rewarded with a promotion for preventing negative consequences resulting from the company’s outdated policies and procedures.
For example, Albert has learned about the AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountans)/CICA (Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants) Privacy Maturity Model (PMM). Albert thinks the model is a useful way to measure Treasure Box’s ability to protect personal data. Albert has noticed that Treasure Box fails to meet the requirements of the highest level of maturity of this model; at his interview, Albert will pledge to assist the company with meeting this level in order to provide customers with the most rigorous security available.
Albert does want to show a positive outlook during his interview. He intends to praise the company’s commitment to the security of customer and employee personal data against external threats. However, Albert worries about the high turnover rate within the company, particularly in the area of direct phone marketing. He sees many unfamiliar faces every day who are hired to do the marketing, and he often hears complaints in the lunch room regarding long hours and low pay, as well as what seems to be flagrant disregard for company procedures.
In addition, Treasure Box has had two recent security incidents. The company has responded to the incidents with internal audits and updates to security safeguards. However, profits still seem to be affected and anecdotal evidence indicates that many people still harbor mistrust. Albert wants to help the company recover. He knows there is at least one incident the public in unaware of, although Albert does not know the details. He believes the company’s insistence on keeping the incident a secret could be a further detriment to its reputation. One further way that Albert wants to help Treasure Box regain its stature is by creating a toll-free number for customers, as well as a more efficient procedure for responding to customer concerns by postal mail.
In addition to his suggestions for improvement, Albert believes that his knowledge of the company’s recent business maneuvers will also impress the interviewers. For example, Albert is aware of the company’s intention to acquire a medical supply company in the coming weeks.
With his forward thinking, Albert hopes to convince the managers who will be interviewing him that he is right for the job.
In consideration of the company’s new initiatives, which of the following laws and regulations would be most appropriate for Albert to mention at the interview as a priority concern for the privacy team?

  • A. Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA)
  • B. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
  • C. The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA)
  • D. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 17
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